REVIEW OF ROBERT EVERSZ'S
SHOOTING ELVIS

By Denise Baton

Robert Eversz opens his first in the NINA ZERO series with the title: CONFESSION OF AN ACCIDENTAL TERRORIST copyrighted 1995 by Mary Alice Baker. Itís a confession written by our unique protagonist to her mother, Florence Alice Baker. And with this opening we understand that our heroine wants her mother to know exactly what happened to her. As reader, we are cast in the role of concerned mother and the responsibility makes us listen to the details, even the unspoken words that explain how our very own daughter, a sweet young thing, who begins the story at the point when sheís working at the Hansel & Gretelís Baby Photo Studio, became labeled a terrorist and a killer.

Let me just say that you wonít be bored. The transformation that this young woman goes through is an exhilarating ride through the Hollywood backroads, the art world and the subculture of LAís punk and crime scene. What we learn about Mary Alice Baker, who quickly becomes Nino Zero, is that she may be naive but she ainít dumb. If her family life has warped her you canít blame her for that. And if her boyfriend is a coward, a sleaze and an opportunist of the worse kind, thatís not really Mary Aliceís fault either. That she takes none of it lying down is only admirable. The unexpected is half the fun of this story but just keep in mind that a Yale key can unlock any number of things including a storage locker. And that a friend in the movie business is a friend in deed and youíll be set up for the ride of your life. Not to mention the fact that youíll have every reason to be concerned about Mary Alice, uh er, Nino Zero, every step of the way.

After youíve read SHOOTING ELVIS, check out KILLLING PAPARAZZI, the next book in the NINA ZERO series by Robert M. Eversz.